Resource Library

NYC Early Childhood Research Network Resources

Start Date July 2016 End Date June 2020

Description

The NYC Early Childhood Research Network develops and creates publications and presentations that synthesize information across Network Studies. We also share publicly available research that can help inform early childhood policy and practice in New York City. 

Design

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Researchers

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Contributing Institutions

Resources

Authored November 2017
Authors

Sherry Cleary & Kate Tarrant, Sara Vecchiotti, Faith Lamb-Parker, Travis Cramer, Kelvin Chan

Institutions NYC Early Childhood Research Network
Type Presentation

The session at the 2017 APPAM Fall Research Conference described the implementation of a unique research and policy collaboration: The New York Early Childhood Research Network. This first-of-its kind collaboration between a foundation, researchers in the metropolitan area, and key policymakers focused on a shared goal of improving New York City Universal Prekindergarten (UPK) program. Eight research studies are providing actionable and scientifically rigorous research findings using diverse methodologies to support continuous improvement of UPK.

Authored February 2016
Authors

New York Early Childhood Professional Development Institute

Institutions NYC Early Childhood Research Network
Type Policy Brief

This paper describes QUALITYstarsNY is New York State’s comprehensive quality rating and improvement system for all regulated early childhood programs—this includes child care in both centers and homes, pre-kindergarten in both schools and centers, and Head Start programs. 

Seeing and hearing: The impacts of New York City’s universal pre-kindergarten program on the health of low-income children

Authored March 2019
Authors

Kai Hong, Kacie Dragan, & Sherry Glied

Institutions NYC Early Childhood Research Network
Type Journal Article Abstract

We examine the effect of New York City’s universal pre-kindergarten program (UPK) on the health and utilization of children enrolled in Medicaid using a difference-in-regression-discontinuities design. We find that UPK increases the probability that a child is diagnosed with asthma or with vision problems, receives treatment for hearing or vision problems, or receives an immunization or screening during the pre-kindergarten year. These effects are not offset by lower rates in the kindergarten year, suggesting that UPK accelerates the rate at which children are identified with and treated for conditions that could potentially delay learning and cause behavioral problems.

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhealeco.2019.01.004 

Authored October 2014
Authors

Bruce Fuller with Elise Cappella, Thao Nguyen, and Allison Thai

Institutions N/A
Type Policy Brief

We tracked the location of new child seats in the opening year of Mr. de Blasio’s pre-k effort. This brief first details varying levels of growth in the count of seats situated in public schools, looking across the city’s boroughs and communities, which differ widely in their economic vitality and organized infrastructure. We then examine the evolving distribution of seats situated in community organizations, asking whether they help to equalize children’s access to preschool. The city’s departments of education and health have published neighborhood-level data on the location of pre-k seats for 2013 and 2014, the inventories on which our analysis is based.

Authored April 2018
Authors

New York City Independent Budget Office

Institutions N/A
Type Policy Brief

This policy brief provides information on the preliminary budget for New York City's 3-K for All program launched in 2017. The brief explains the landscape of the City's early education programs including the sources of funding. Additionally, there is a description of the proposed roll-out for 3-K for All.

Authored May 2019
Authors

Scott M. Stringer

Institutions N/A
Type Other

This report by the The New York City Comptroller provides an analysis of the current landscape for infant and toddler care in New York City. It descibes a proposed "NYC Under 3" plan to be implemented over 6 years.  The report lays out how each year would be rolled out. It suggests recommendations with the goal of making services more affordable and accessible to families.  Additionally, it explains some challenges within the resources currently available for infant and toddler care in the city

Authored January 2020
Authors

James A. Parrott

Institutions N/A
Type Policy Brief

This report takes a look at the progress made by New York City's July 2019 commitment to starting pay salary parity for early childhood educators. It describes the recent history of pay parity issues, and the challenges for Community Based Organizations (CBOs) in New York City. The gains made and continued challenges are discussed, including disparity in health and other benefits.

Authored March 2018
Authors

Shira K. Mattera, Robin Jacob, & Pamela A. Morris

Institutions N/A
Type Other

This report focuses on the effects of two enhanced math interventions in New York City. Making Pre-K Count involved randomly assigning pre-k programs to receive an evidence-based early math curriculum and associated professional development or to a "pre-k as usual" condition.  In the High 5's study, students from the Making Pre-K Count program classrooms in pre-k were individually randomly assigned to small-group math clubs in their kindergarten year.  The impacts of these interventions along with contributing factors and implications are discussed.

Authored February 2016
Authors

Westat, Metis Associates, & Branch Associates

Institutions N/A
Type Other

The New York City Department of Education, in conjunction with the New York City Center for Economic Opportunity, collaborated with Westat, Metis Associates, and Branch Associates, with additional support from New York University's Institute for Human Development and Social Change to conduct a study of the initial year of the New York City Pre-K for All program. This report also includes a summary of the findings from that study.  Additionally, accomplishments and improvements made in the second year of the program are discussed.  These improvements address some findings that arose from the study.

Authored February 2018
Authors

Westat, Metis Associates, & Branch Associates 

Institutions N/A
Type Other

The New York City Department of Education, in conjunction with the Mayor's Office for Economic Opportunity, collaborated with Westat, Metis Associates, and Branch Associates to conduct a study of the progress made by the New York City Pre-K for All program in its second year of implementation. This report is the second one conducted by Westat. It includes a summary of the findings from the current study.  Additionally, a memo discussing the accomplishments and improvements made in the third year of the program (2016-2017) is included.  

Authored January 2016
Authors

Jeanne L. Reid, Anne Martin and Jeanne Brooks-Gunn

Institutions N/A
Type Journal Article Abstract

 

This small study included 51 parents at three childcare centers in New York City.  It provides background information on the importance of interactions for parents; both with teachers and other parents.  The researchers suggest that little is known about the extent, location, and content of these interactions. However, building these social ties is valuable.  The various types of adult interactions at the centers are discussed, along with limitations of the research and recommendations.

Authored July 2019
Authors

Andrew Cavanagh 

Institutions N/A
Type Policy Brief

This report describes the economic integration of the Educational Alliance pre-kindergarten program of the Manny Cantor Center (MCC).  This program, located in the Lower East Side of New York City, services a racially and economically diverse group of families.  For the first time in 2018, MCC placed 72 UPK students into four classrooms, regardless of their family’s point of entry into the program as Head Start-eligible or tuition-paying. The report also includes the challenges encountered, benefits achieved, and recommendations for such integration in the future.  

Authored June 2017
Authors

Paul Lopatto 

Institutions N/A
Type Policy Brief

This report from the New York City Independent Budget Office provides an overview of the landscape of the New York City child care system from 2012 through 2016.  It includes a description of programs introduced, capacity changes, and funding.  Additionally, there is a discussion of potential future challenges.

Authored October 2019
Authors

Halley Potter

Institutions N/A
Type Policy Brief

This brief explains the steps New York City has taken towards integration of it's early care system. It describes the current early care landscape of New York City (birth through five years old). The author also presents brief information on the lack of diversity within the national early childhood education landscape.  A summary of previous research findings of the benefits of integration are discussed.  Additionally, the challenges and benefits of such intergration within the City are presented.  The brief describes policy recommendations for the City's future efforts towards integration.

Authored November 2017
Authors

Sheila Smith, Maribel R. Granja, & Uyen Sophie Nguyen

Institutions N/A
Type Policy Brief

This report by the National Center for Children in Poverty provides information about young children (age birth through nine years old) living in deep poverty within New York State.  The  authors provide data on the prevalence of deep poverty (families with an income below 50 percent of the Federal Poverty Level) within the state, areas of concentration of this poverty, state policies that support these families, and recommendations for two-generation policies to improve the education and health of children.

Authored March 2012
Authors

Sharon Lynn Kagan, Anne Martin, Rebecca Gomez, Elise Castillo, Erin Bumgarner, Emily Kennedy, Lakshmi Humar, & Jeanne Brooks-Gunn

Institutions N/A
Type Other

This report presents the findings of a comprehensive study by the National Center for Children and Families at Teachers College Columbia University.  The year-long study examined the quality and accessibility of early childhood services for young children (defined for the purpose of the report as children ages birth to school entry).  The report describes the geographical and demographic layout of Long Island.  The authors then present the findings of the study including the strengths and challenges of the available early childhood services. Recommendations are suggested for the future including incentives for the wider use of QualityStarsNY.

Authored December 2013
Authors

Meghan P. McCormick, Elise Capella, Erin E. O'Connor, & Sandee G. McClowry 

Institutions N/A
Type Journal Article Abstract

This research examines student problem behaviors using an ecological perspective.  This approach highlights the importance of interactions between the home and school for positive child outcomes.  While the importance of parent involvement has been established, the current study builds on previous research by examining the interactive effect of parent involvement and teacher emotional supports on children’s behaviors.  Data was collected from parents, teachers and classroom observations on 255 low income students in 60 kindergartens in New York City.  A review of the literature, study methods, findings, limitations, and implications are discussed.

Authored January 2016
Authors

Randi Levine

Institutions N/A
Type Policy Brief

The process of transitioning to kindergarten is often a complicated one for families.  This is especially so for families of children with disabilities. This issue brief describes this "Turning 5" process that families go through as their Individualized Education Program is reevaluated before entry into kindergarten. The brief also describes the assistance that the advocacy group Advocacy for Children of New York, in collaboration with the New York City Department of Education, provide for families going through the process.

Authored N/A
Authors

Mary Erin Sheppard

Institutions N/A
Type Working Paper

This dissertation is a descriptive study that examines preschool special education teams in New York City.  The study involved collecting data through a survey of 111 families and in-depth interviews of 10 parents.  The findings are presented and discussed including an analysis of the different responses according to demographics.  Suggestions for future research are included.​

Authored July 2015
Authors

Meghan P. McCormick, Elise Cappella, Erin E. O’Connor, & Sandee G. McClowry

Institutions N/A
Type Policy Brief

While the importance of social-emotional learning (SEL) has been established, there have been few research studies on the impact of SEL on academic achievement in particular.  This study examined the impact of SEL on academic achievement in early childhood. Specifically, it evaluated whether the SEL program INSIGHTS improved low-income kindergarten and first grade students’ math and reading achievement by first enhancing classroom emotional support and organization.  The results and implications for research and planning of SEL programs are discussed.

Authored November 2016
Authors

Haeny S. Yoon, Carmen Llerena, & Emma Brooks

Institutions N/A
Type Journal Article Abstract

This article tells the story of “Lucas,” a kindergartener with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).  The study includes multiple perspectives of Lucas including his mother, his teacher, and a teacher-educator in the classroom.  The authors describe in detail how a play/writing project in the classroom was used as a tool for fostering inclusion.  The article challenges some of the common assumptions of children with ASD and makes recommendations for using children’s play to encourage inclusion.

Authored January 2018
Authors

Haeny S. Yoon

Institutions N/A
Type Journal Article Abstract

This article explores building on children’s engagement with popular culture as an entry point for literacy.  The researcher explores the interest of kindergarteners in popular culture, specifically Star Wars.  The extension and authentication of literacy as the children play out scenes is examined.

Authored February 2014
Authors

Julia Gelatt and Heather Sandstrom

Institutions N/A
Type Policy Brief

This brief describes the context, design, and implementation of the EarlyLearn program in New York City. It was compiled through interviews with past and present Administration for Children's Services (ACS) staff members, EarlyLearn providers, early childhood advocates, ACS reports, and publically available resources. The authors detail how the program reorganized the child care system in NYC. The successes, challenges, and a potential path forward are discussed.

Authored February 2017
Authors

Ashleigh Collins, Erin O’Connor, & Sandee McClowry

Institutions N/A
Type Journal Article Abstract

This study builds on previous research studying temperament in early childhood. It examines the role of child temperament profiles and child gender on children’s standardized academic outcomes following participation in the school-based, INSIGHTS temperament intervention. The study included 324 kindergarten students attending urban, low-income schools. A review of the literature, description of the study methods and findings, and implications for future practice are included. Findings suggested that cautious and male kindergarten intervention participants attained higher standardized mathematics and literacy scores than their non-intervention participating counterparts. 

Authored March 2016
Authors

Mi-Hyun Chung & Barbara Keckler

Institutions N/A
Type Journal Article Abstract

This article explores how using science-themed books in shared-book experience classes may influence science literacy. The authors discuss previous literature including research related to integrating reading development and content-area reading. The study included seven first grade students from the New York Metropolitan Area, and it involved eight shared book experiences over twenty-four sessions with the children. During the sessions, the children’s questions and comments were collected. The findings, conclusions, and implications from the study are discussed.

Authored June 2020
Authors

Mai Miksic & Kendra Hurley

Institutions N/A
Type Policy Brief

This report from the Day Care Council of New York describes and examines the operations of 13 early childhood programs that remained open during the COVID-19 pandemic.The sample included nine center based providers and four family child care providers in New York City. The authors conducted interviews with representatives from each program. The report provides the findings from these interviews, including information on the daily schedule of the programs during the pandemic. It also describes the concerns of providers, including those related to public health requirements and economic viability. The authors suggest recommendations to be considered as New York City starts to reopen its early education system.

Authored July 2020
Authors

Vanessa Rodriguez, S. Lynneth Solis, Bryan Mascio, Kathleen Kiely Gouley, Patricia A. Jennings & Laurie M. Brotman

Institutions N/A
Type Journal Article Abstract

This research builds on the Prosocial Classroom Model by using The Five Awarenesses of Teaching Framework to understand social-emotional competency (SEC) through a developmental lens.  The study involved eighteen Early Care and Education (ECE) teachers.  Three key themes were identified: 1) The Framework described cognitive capacities relevant to ECE teacher SEC consistent with other teacher populations; 2) there was an underlying conflict between teachers’ keen awareness of student social-emotional learning (SEL) and an active suppression of their own social and emotional well-being; and 3) the impact and importance of race, ethnicity, and family engagement.  The findings and implications for policy or practice are described. 

 

Authored July 2020
Authors

Kathleen O’Connor Duffany, Katharine H. McVeigh, Heather S. Lipkind, Trace S. Kershaw & Jeannette R. Ickovics

Institutions N/A
Type Policy Brief

 

This study examined academic delays for children born large for gestational age (LGA). It assessed effect modification by maternal obesity and diabetes and then characterized risks for LGA for those with a mediating condition. Cohort data were obtained from the New York City Longitudinal Study of Early Development, linking birth and educational records (n = 125,542).  Findings and suggestions for future research are described.

Authored June 2020
Authors

Kate Tarrant & Mark Nagasawa

Institutions NYC Early Childhood Research Network
Type Other

This report provides the findings and discussion of a survey completed by the New York Early Childhood Professional Development Institute, in partnership with the Bank Street College of Education.The survey sought to understand the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on New York’s early childhood workforce. The survey included early childhood program leaders, teachers, and family child care providers. Over 3,000 individuals who are members of the state’s Aspire Registry responded. The report provides a descriptive snapshot of the workforce during the pandemic. It also includes suggestions for next steps as the worforce moves forward.

Authored June 2020
Authors

Kate Tarrant & Mark Nagasawa

Institutions NYC Early Childhood Research Network
Type Other

This executive summary provides a brief report of the findings and discussion of a survey completed by the New York Early Childhood Professional Development Institute, in partnership with the Bank Street College of Education.The survey sought to understand the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on New York’s early childhood workforce. The survey included early childhood program leaders, teachers, and family child care providers. Over 3,000 individuals who are members of the state’s Aspire Registry responded. The summary provides a brief descriptive snapshot of the workforce during the pandemic.